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nsw_lidar [2019/02/08 03:15]
bushwalking
nsw_lidar [2019/08/30 09:35]
bushwalking
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-Page for documenting NSW lidar processing 
 ====== Intro ====== ====== Intro ======
 NSW Spatial Services have undertaken a program to map all of NSW using lidar (light detecting and ranging) NSW Spatial Services have undertaken a program to map all of NSW using lidar (light detecting and ranging)
 For details, see information on their [[http://​spatialservices.finance.nsw.gov.au/​mapping_and_imagery/​environmental_spatial_programs|elevation program]]. For details, see information on their [[http://​spatialservices.finance.nsw.gov.au/​mapping_and_imagery/​environmental_spatial_programs|elevation program]].
  
-Elevation data can best be accessed through the [[http://​elevation.fsdf.org.au/​|Geoscience Australia ELVIS program]], and then processed with a GIS such as [[https://​www.qgis.org/​en/​site/​index.html|QGIS]] to create useful topographic maps.+Elevation data can best be accessed through the [[http://​elevation.fsdf.org.au/​|Geoscience Australia ELVIS program]]
 + 
 +It can then processed with a GIS such as [[https://​www.qgis.org/​en/​site/​index.html|QGIS]] to create useful topographic maps. Instructions below are specifically for use with QGIS, though the general outline may be useful for other GISs.
  
 ====== Resources ====== ====== Resources ======
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 The NSW DEM data is supplied in 2km squares. The squares need to be merged into a single DEM for further operations. The NSW DEM data is supplied in 2km squares. The squares need to be merged into a single DEM for further operations.
  
-While this can be done in theory using a virtual raster, I have had poor performance with this. Any operation seems to result in screen redrawing, so moving around and zooming in and out is quite slow and painful.+While this can be done in theory using a Virtual Raster, I have had poor performance with this. Any operation seems to result in screen redrawing, so moving around and zooming in and out is quite slow and painful. Possibly more recent versions of QGIS have resolved these issues.
  
 Instead, I generally use the the Raster- > Miscellaneous -> Merge... function Instead, I generally use the the Raster- > Miscellaneous -> Merge... function
 +
 +Note that while most of the eastern ranges, where a lot of bushwalking happens, are 2m DEMs, the coast is typically 1m, and the western slopes and plains are 5m (with major rivers 1m!). QGIS appears to merge DEMs to the highest resolution (ie a combination of 1m and 2m DEMs will be merged to a 1m resolution output file). This may not always be desired. The 1m DEMs can be downsampled to say 2m in QGIS using the Warp (reproject) tool with an Output resolution of 2.
  
 ===== Fill Sinks ===== ===== Fill Sinks =====
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 ===== Contours ===== ===== Contours =====
 +==== Basic Processing ====
 There are various contour extraction algorithms in QGIS, for example: There are various contour extraction algorithms in QGIS, for example:
   * GDAL : Raster Extraction : Contour (same as Raster -> Extraction -> Contour...)   * GDAL : Raster Extraction : Contour (same as Raster -> Extraction -> Contour...)
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 {{:​2019_02_08_12_17_09_untitled_project_qgis.png?​300|}} {{:​2019_02_08_12_17_09_untitled_project_qgis.png?​300|}}
 {{:​2019_02_08_12_17_57_untitled_project_qgis.png?​300|}} {{:​2019_02_08_12_17_57_untitled_project_qgis.png?​300|}}
 +
 +Even with sink removal, small 
 +
 +==== Simplifying ====
 +
 +Vectors can be compressed by using something like:
 +  * Vector geometry : Simplify
 +A tolerance of 1(m) seems reasonable for 1:25000 mapping. Smaller tolerances may be appropriate for larger scale maps (eg 1:10000, 1:5000).
 +
 +For more options in compression,​ look at:
 +  * GRASS : [[https://​grasswiki.osgeo.org/​wiki/​V.generalize_tutorial|v.generalize]]
 +V.generalize can also be used to smooth contours - possibly best done prior to simplificiation
 +
 +==== Cleaning ====
 +
 +Once simplified, it is worth removing small closed loops, such as those in the image below.
 +{{:​contour_loops.png|}}
 +
 +Here is one approach, which involves adding a length attribute to each contour, and removing those that fall below a certain length. It may cause issues if you have short sections of contour near the edge of the map that you need.
 +
 +  * Open Attribute Table (F6)
 +  * Open field calculator (Ctrl+I)
 +  * Add new attribute length, calculated as $length
 +{{::​qgis_add_field.png|}}
 +  * Select all features and filter on length < 25 (or whatever length is appropriate for your scale)
 +{{:​qgis_filter_field.png|}}
  
 ==== Contour Labelling ==== ==== Contour Labelling ====
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 {{:​2019-02-08_12_41_50-channel_network.png?​600|}} {{:​2019-02-08_12_41_50-channel_network.png?​600|}}
  
-The raster channel network can then be classified ​and converted ​to vector.+==== Classification ==== 
 + 
 +For 1:25000 maps, I've had reasonable results from using the following formula in the Raster Calculator to classify the streams into categories. Different scales may need different bounds, ​and this doesn'​t account for significantly larger rivers. 
 + 
 +''​( log10 ( "​Catchment Area@1"​ ) >= x) * ( log10 ( "​Catchment Area@1"​ ) < y) * ("​Channel Network@1"​ != 0)''​ 
 + 
 +  * Intermittent:​ 4-6.15 (x-y) 
 +  * Minor: 6.15-7.4  
 +  * Major: 7.4+ 
 + 
 +==== Convert to Vector and Simplify ==== 
 + 
 +Convert ​to vector ​using r.to.vect 
 + 
 +{{:​qgis_raw_stream.png?​600|}} 
 + 
 +The raw stream data is very jagged. Smooth using  
 +  * v.generalize 
 +  * Algorithm = Hermite (there are other options which can be used, but Hermite has the smoothed line passing through the points of the original)  
 +  * Maximal tolerance value = 20 (in m, obviously scale dependent) 
 + 
 +Simplify using using: 
 +  * Vector geometry : Simplify 
 +Tolerance:?​ 
  
 ===== Clifflines ===== ===== Clifflines =====
  
-The steps below have been tested ​in the Blue Mountains, a region that has a significant number of relatively vertical sandstone cliffs. It may be less effective in different terrain.+The steps below are being developed for use in the Blue Mountains, a region that has a significant number of relatively vertical sandstone cliffs. It may be less effective in different terrain. 
 + 
 +This is more a set of ideas than a fully fledged process. The main aims are to get a set of steps that can largely be automated, and that create cliffline vectors that are running in the correct direction. There is still some way to go on this!
  
 ==== Initial analysis of slope, aspect ==== ==== Initial analysis of slope, aspect ====
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 using DEM and [1] Maximum Triangle Slope (Tarboton (1997)). I haven'​t tested any other algorithms. ​ using DEM and [1] Maximum Triangle Slope (Tarboton (1997)). I haven'​t tested any other algorithms. ​
   
-Cliff areas can be identified using a range of 60-90 and 70-90 degrees on the Slope file. Using 60-90 degrees helps connect logical cliffs and avoid small breaks.+Cliff areas can be identified using a range of say 60-90 and 70-90 degrees on the Slope file. Using 60-90 degrees helps connect logical cliffs and avoid small breaks.
  
 ==== Initial Cleaning ==== ==== Initial Cleaning ====
  
 Next convert data to 1 bit (1,2 not 0,1, as Sieve ignores 0s) using Raster Calculator. Next convert data to 1 bit (1,2 not 0,1, as Sieve ignores 0s) using Raster Calculator.
-Formula is: (Slope > 0) + 1+Formula is: (Slope > 60) + 1
  
 Then Sieve resulting data using a Threshold of 100 and 8-connectedness to get rid of small non-connected cliffs. Note above that Sieve doesn'​t like 0s. Then Sieve resulting data using a Threshold of 100 and 8-connectedness to get rid of small non-connected cliffs. Note above that Sieve doesn'​t like 0s.
nsw_lidar.txt · Last modified: 2020/09/09 10:36 by allchin09